Posts Tagged 'Samit Basu'

More Mini Reviews

The Goat, The Sofa And Mr Swami – R Chandrasekhar
If you have not read this book, you have missed a masterpiece. This is one of the best satires that I’ve ever read. The story follows Swami – the secretary of the Indian Prime-Minister (a horny octogenarian) and his efforts to keep his job by keeping the coalition afloat in the face of the impeding visit of the Pakistan’s Premier.
This book is a must read. It has a lot of shades of “Yes Minister” or the Indian version “Ji Mantriji” and is equally hilarious.
Rating: 4.5/5

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Sh*t My Dad Says – Justin Halpern
Now this is one book whose title speaks volumes about the content. It is exactly what the title says – the author moves back with his father and his 74 year old father provides him with life lessons in a unique manner. Sample this: “That woman was sexy… Out of your league? Son, let women figure out why they won’t screw you. Don’t do it for them.” and there are many more similar gems strewn around the book.
A book which originated from a twitter account @shitmydadsays. A very enjoyable read.
Rating: 3.5/5

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Turbulence – Samit Basu

I have been a fan of Samit Basu’s writing ever since reading the Gameworld Trilogy and Terror on the Titanic, and hence I had very high expectations of this book. I was hoping for that same combination of dark humour with generous doses of fantasy. While fantasy was present in abundance, I missed the dark humour in the book, but then that is just fan speak. That did not take away anything from this excellent book. This was one such book which I wanted to pick up as soon as I had read the blurb.

This is an excerpt from the review I wrote for India Book Store’s book review site.
Read the complete book review.
Rating: 4/5

Titanic, Japan, Nalanda & Cricket

If I can read four books in parallel, what is stopping me from reviewing four books in one post? Nothing, and hence that is exactly what I’m gonna do, as I did earlier. Posting mini reviews of the books that I finished sometime in last two weeks.

Terror on the Titanic – Samit Basu
Samit Basu is an incredible writer. I had become his fan after reading the Gameworld Trilogy (1, 2, 3). Fantasy mixed with dark humour – that seems to be a unique genre :) In my opinion, he is one of the best writers in India.

Coming to the book, this one has been termed as Young Adults’ Fiction, although to be honest I never felt I was reading a YA book. Samit Basu weaves a thriller around the Titanic voyage, and the way he has used the memorable scenes from the movie Titanic as backdrop for his story is amazing. The plot never slacks, and all his characters are, to put it mildly, very interesting. Any one who enjoys reading the genre fantasy should always pick up the author’s books.

I think it is time for me to order Turbulence :)
Rating: 4/5

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The Wit Of Cricket – Barry Johnston, John Ireland
It is a must read for any person who loves tales about Cricket. Dickie Bird, Fred Trueman, and Richie Benaud are some of the guys who recall interesting, witty happenings that happen either on the cricket field or off it. One incident that amused me no end was one where the batsman in some club cricket match skied a catch, and as three fielders were converging on it he shouted “Mine”. All three fielders stopped and the catch went down.

A delightful book, especially when read in short-bursts.
Rating: 3/5

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The Nalanda Chronicles – Kalpish Ratna
This book is not just a fun read, it also seems to me a study in sketching characters for any written piece. This novella traces the story of a bus and its occupants for a single day when the bus gets hijacked. The writers (Kalpana Swaminathan and Ishrat Syed, who write jointly as Kalpish Ratna) could surely give a lesson to most writers as to how a character should be fleshed, and how the editing should be. A simple story told in a simple way. If you get your hands on this book, do not leave it before reading the book cover-to-cover.
Rating: 3/5

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Made In Japan – Akio Morita
It is the story of Sony Corp, through the eyes of its founder Akio Morita. Starting the company in a war-ravaged building with a handful of people, today Sony is a household name. The book also follows the growth of Japan, its relations with other countries and the author also talks about Japanese traditions. This book was a inspirational read – anyone who wants to start something of his own, and is afraid, should read this book. The book gives you a kick!
Rating: 4/5

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Meet the Blogger…

I write! Topic does not matter, can be my life, or my travels, or any match I saw, or the Hyderabadi life, or reminiscing about Raipur, or penning Short Stories & 55s.

I can be contacted at kunalblogs[at]gmail[dot]com.

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